December 7th, 2011
chasewhiteside
Read This, Not That: The Real Problem with Fox News
The liberal platitude that Fox News is a propaganda arm for the Republican Party has gone mainstream; even the Obama administration has taken aim. But Terry McDermott argues in the Columbia Journalism Review that Fox’s agenda isn’t political, but commercial, and that the network has simply mastered the format better than its competitors:

Over the course of an average day, all this talking on the three channels adds up to more than half a million words spilled on cable-news air. That’s a phenomenal amount of verbiage—by volume, a new War and Peace every single day. It does not, as you might guess, approach anything like the art and coherence of a novel. Rarely does a single sentence rise to that level.
What are they talking about all the time? Usually, they’re talking about what a particular little morsel of news means. What is that bit of news good for? Whom is it good for? Who’s up, who’s sideways, who’s selling the country down the river? There is a very large measure of performance involved in all of this. The studio hosts typically play some amped-up, over-the-top version of themselves. They bring to mind nothing so much as one of the vibrant monologues from the Howard Beale character in the movie Network: “Television is a Goddamned amusement park! Television is a circus, a carnival, a traveling troupe of acrobats, storytellers, dancers, singers, jugglers, sideshow freaks, lion tamers, and football players. We’re in the boredom-killing business!’

Read the full article here.
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Read This, Not That: The Real Problem with Fox News

The liberal platitude that Fox News is a propaganda arm for the Republican Party has gone mainstream; even the Obama administration has taken aim. But Terry McDermott argues in the Columbia Journalism Review that Fox’s agenda isn’t political, but commercial, and that the network has simply mastered the format better than its competitors:

Over the course of an average day, all this talking on the three channels adds up to more than half a million words spilled on cable-news air. That’s a phenomenal amount of verbiage—by volume, a new War and Peace every single day. It does not, as you might guess, approach anything like the art and coherence of a novel. Rarely does a single sentence rise to that level.

What are they talking about all the time? Usually, they’re talking about what a particular little morsel of news means. What is that bit of news good for? Whom is it good for? Who’s up, who’s sideways, who’s selling the country down the river? There is a very large measure of performance involved in all of this. The studio hosts typically play some amped-up, over-the-top version of themselves. They bring to mind nothing so much as one of the vibrant monologues from the Howard Beale character in the movie Network: “Television is a Goddamned amusement park! Television is a circus, a carnival, a traveling troupe of acrobats, storytellers, dancers, singers, jugglers, sideshow freaks, lion tamers, and football players. We’re in the boredom-killing business!’

Read the full article here.

// Follow Read This, Not That on Tumblr / Facebook / Twitter //

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